Ex•e•ge•sis

Coming from the Greek word exēgeomai, which means to lead or draw out, exegesis is the art and science of drawing out the original intended meaning of a text. We cannot understand what a particular Scripture means for us today if we have not first taken the time to come to grips with the original…

Want More

Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee. So that we may boldly say, The Lord is my helper, and I will not fear what man shall do unto me.—Hebrews 13:5–6 As fallen human beings, we…

And I Quote… August 22

Humility has nothing to do with depreciating ourselves and our gifts in ways we know to be untrue. Even “humble” attitudes can be masks of pride. Humility is that freedom from our self which enables us to be in positions in which we have neither recognition nor importance, neither power nor visibility, and even experience…

Friday Findings—August 19

Ten Things Pastors Would Love to Hear from Their Church Members “It is a simple question. What do you hear from your church members that gives you the greatest encouragement? The responses from the pastors were amazingly similar. In fact, I was able to focus on ten specific areas. Here are summary statements of those…

Ends and Means | Family Camp Flashback

Our culture is addicted to success. From parenting to painting to online image managing, we are constantly bombarded with a thousand and one means by which we are promised a success that has to this point eluded us. Churches and other religious organizations are often not far behind in their promises. If you will follow…

Family Camp

Starting tonight, and running through Thursday, our church will be experiencing Family Camp at Tall Timber Ranch. Since the primary purpose of this blog is to serve the members of our church, I will be scheduling “flashbacks” of our most popular posts during this time. Enjoy!

And I Quote… August 15

And-I-QuoteTo be a follower of the Crucified means, sooner or later, a personal encounter with the cross. And the cross always entails loss. The great symbol of Christianity means sacrifice and no one who calls himself a Christian can evade this stark fact.

Elisabeth Elliot, These Strange Ashes, (Revell, 1998), 145